Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Rehousing a FAB Chorus Pedal - Phase 2

So phase 1 of "how to destroy a $15 effect pedal" was tear down. Phase 2 is thinking about what I'm actually planning on doing. Since I'm not using this as a door stop or battering ram, I thought it would be cool to have a transparent box to show off the circuit boards.  Plus, I can just have the 'effect on' led floating in the box and it will light up the whole thing.  Or at least that's the plan.  Now through my job, I have access to lots of great tools and scrap materials.  I was originally going to make it out of 1/2" plexiglas, but it was just too stupidly thick.  I chose 1/4" because I wanted to keep the pedal on the small side, and I think that it will be plenty burly enough with that thickness of material.

STEP 1

Okay, so I cheated with step 1 which is "build the whole box." When you build a box, it might not be anything like mine, so specifics are really irrelevant.  The hardest part was getting the holes for the potentiometers to fit the existing board snugly.  I could get new pots for the controls, but I thought this would be challenging enough.  They already work, I just hated how they were positioned on the original pedal.

STEP 2

Here it is split apart awaiting some guts.  I intend to remove the 9v battery clip since I plan to run this off of an adapter.  I also haven't decided how I'm actually going to hold the two halves together.  I could use screws, but since I don't need battery access and I don't think I'll ever want to get inside once I'm done, I might just solvent cement it closed and call it a day.  I'm trying to think of something cool to use for knobs...

STEP 3

Here it is closed up.  Nothing is mounted on the inside, but you see the amount of space there is to work with.  I need to drill holes for the input and output jacks, the DC power supply jack and the momentary switch to operate the pedal.  The scary part is phase 3.  That's when the soldering iron comes out and stuff starts catching on fire.  I ordered a bunch of parts and a solder sucker, so I've now invested more than the cost of the pedal in this project.  But hey, its educational.

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